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  • Field Notes – March 2017

    With gardening season now in full swing, David Redhage responds to the final book of the late “contrary farmer,” Gene Logsdon – a letter to young farmers on “new garden farms.” In the same vein,…

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  • President’s Note: New Book Entitled “Letter to a Young Farmer”

    There are many books published about sustainable agriculture. One author I have always enjoyed reading is Gene Logsdon. I have most of his books. He has written on many subjects related to agricultural production. I…

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  • Native Prairie Prescribed Burn

    March fires bring April flowers – if the rains are right! This spring the Kerr Center conducted a prescribed burn of an eight-acre native prairie, which is part of a larger 40 acre pasture. We…

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  • Texas Research Explores Spinach Varieties for Organic Production

    from AgriLife Today, via ATTRA: Researchers at Texas A&M are screening various spinach varieties to identify those with both improved nitrogen-use efficiency and disease resistance, as a first step toward developing cultivars adapted to production…

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  • Herbicide Injury Image Database

    The University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service now has an online Herbicide Injury Database that shows images of different plants’ responses to herbicides.  The plants included in the database included vegetable and field crops, as…

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  • New Study: Best Time to Crimp-Kill Cover Crops Is…

    Clair Keene, a researcher at The Pennsylvania State University, and her colleagues wanted to find the perfect time to crimp-kill a cover crop: grown long enough to make biomass adequate to suppress weeds, but not far enough along to make seeds.

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  • usda-ars-steam-cleaning-melons

    Making Melons Safer with Steam

    Steam can more effectively combat food pathogens on cantaloupes than traditional removal methods. That’s the finding of an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania. Dike Ukuku and his colleagues have demonstrated that a relatively inexpensive steam cleaner (designed to remove wallpaper and clean outdoor grills) can rid cantaloupes of common pathogens more effectively than existing techniques.

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  • Free Monarch Presentation March 4 in Broken Arrow

    FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Dr. Chip Taylor, Founder & Director of Monarch Watch, and Professor in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kansas, will deliver a free presentation…

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  • President’s Note: Monarch Butterflies

    Many of you may be aware of the plight of the monarch butterfly. This iconic species is struggling to maintain and grow its population. Each year surveys are conducted in the mountains above Mexico City…

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  • Field Notes – February 2017

    This month we take a look at some tips for tasks that are timely as winter winds to a close: – assessing cattle’s body condition by eye – starting transplants from seed We also report…

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Upcoming Events

Apr
28
Fri
Oklahoma Native Plant Society Wonders of Wildflowers Weekend @ Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Pawhuska, OK)
Apr 28 – Apr 30 all-day
Oklahoma Native Plant Society Wonders of Wildflowers Weekend @ Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Pawhuska, OK) | Pawhuska | Oklahoma | United States

Register by April 24 to reserve a lunch.

The Oklahoma Native Plant Society is hosting its annual Wonders of Wildflowers Weekend at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (north of Pawhuska, OK) April 28-30.  This event features guided botanizing on the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, as well as at Osage Hills State Park west of Bartlesville.

For more information and registration, visit http://www.oknativeplants.org/2017-wow.html.

Apr
29
Sat
Agroforestry Workshop @ Allen Research & Education Project Site (Laurie, MO)
Apr 29 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Agroforestry Workshop @ Allen Research & Education Project Site (Laurie, MO) | Gravois Mills | Missouri | United States

Register by April 24.

The Center for Agroforestry at the University of Missouri offers this workshop, with topics including:

– Growing ginseng, shiitake mushrooms, and other forest products
– Forest management for forest products
– Control of invasive species in fields & forests
– Birds of prey and eagle nest viewing
– Glade restoration and management
– Natural beekeeping

For more information or to register, contact Caroline Todd (ToddCS@Missouri.edu, (573) 884-2874), or download the flyer.

Tracing the Steps of Thomas Nuttall through the Poteau River Valley @ Ft. Smith / Poteau area
Apr 29 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Tracing the Steps of Thomas Nuttall through the Poteau River Valley @ Ft. Smith / Poteau area

View the landscape of eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas through the lens of the journal of the first scientist to visit the area. Whether your interests are natural history, human history, or simply exploring, this trip, led by Steve Patterson, Ph.D., will help you see this region with new eyes.

In 1819, when the English botanist and naturalist Thomas Nuttall arrived in Fort Smith, the fort was only two years old. Nuttall’s journal describes prairies in the flat river valleys, thick riverside vegetation, and sparsely wooded hillsides on Sugarloaf and Cavanal. As a plant taxonomist, Nuttall accurately identified many plants still found here today. This tour will follow his path at the same time of year and see what remains and what has changed after nearly 200 years of European-American settlement. The field trip starts at Fort Smith, where the Poteau River enters the Arkansas, and makes its way along the river and through the prairies, to end the day near present-day Lake Wister. The day will begin with a brief introduction on the campus of Kiamichi Technology Center, Poteau, at 9:00, followed by the field trip through the river valley. A box lunch and bus transportation will be provided.

If you would like to read Nuttall’s journal before the class, organizers suggest the edition edited by Savoie Lottinville and published by the University of Oklahoma Press as A Journal of Travels into the Arkansas Territory in the Year 1819.

For more information or to register, contact Nina Morgan (nmmorgan@ktc.edu, (918) 647-5418)
or Danielle Mathews, ( dmathews@ktc.edu, (918) 647-5439), or download the flyer.


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  • Field Notes – March 2017

    With gardening season now in full swing, David Redhage responds to the final book of the late “contrary farmer,” Gene Logsdon – a letter to young farmers on “new garden farms.” In the same vein,…

    Read more

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